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Emergency Help

We can’t be there in person to help and support you in a moment of crisis, but there are other options available to you if you can’t turn to someone you trust. By giving us your postcode (or one nearby to where you are right now) we can let you know about services in your area. Remember: this moment will pass; you won’t always feel the way you do right now. 

If in doubt always call 999.

You can also sign up to Alumina, our online support for mental health and wellbeing here: 

https://www.selfharm.co.uk/alu...

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Dedicated to self-harm recovery, insight and support.

Staying safe on Instagram

Staying safe on Instagram

Staying safe on Instagram is really important. Molly Russell was just 14 years old when she died by suicide after looking at self-harm content on Instagram. For information and advice about how to stay safe on Instagram, check out our blog - 'Staying Instagram Smart'. #instagram #stayingsafe #mollyrussell #suicide 

How NOT to talk about suicide Quiz

How NOT to talk about suicide Quiz

If you've read the blog post we posted earlier today all about how NOT to talk about suicide - you should be ready to take on our 'How NOT to talk about suicide' Quiz!! ✅❎ 

Thoughts of suicide?

Thoughts of suicide?

If you're struggling with thoughts of suicide - get in touch with @papyrus_uk #WMHD #SuicidePrevention

World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day

Today is #WorldMentalHealthDay and the theme for this year's campaign is all about suicide. Throughout today, we're going to be posting advice and support all about raising awareness of suicide in young people and their mental health in general #WMHD#SuicideAwareness

Can Music Make You Feel Better?

Can Music Make You Feel Better?

Yesterday was #bbcmusicday and we came across this fantastic documentary about whether or not music really can make you feel better 🎶😄 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programm...

How to recognise high-functioning anxiety

How to recognise high-functioning anxiety

@cosmopolitanuk have a great article all about 'How to recognise high-functioning anxiety'. Read it here: http://ow.ly/SmEA50w5bFr

Happy GCSE Results Day!

Happy GCSE Results Day!

First of all... CONGRATULATIONS on your GCSE results!! 🎊 Second of all, go get your FREE Nandos!!

#WorldPhotographyDay

#WorldPhotographyDay

It's #WorldPhotographyDay today and we want to encourage you to take and post photos of whatever brings you joy! From flowers to food, and from places to people! If it makes you feel joyful, why not post it? 😊📷  

Happy A-Level Results Day!

Happy A-Level Results Day!

First of all... CONGRATULATIONS on your A-Level results!! 🎊 Second of all, go get your FREE Nandos!!

Mr. Sandman

Dear Diary, 

So yet again, I’m not sleeping well… I am so fed up with this. I go to bed fine but then just lay there for hours – literally – and nothing happens. I feel so unbelievably tired all the time so why can’t I just sleep? 

I see why they use not sleeping as a form of torture in some countries – I feel like I am going mad! 

People tell me all the things I should do…

CAMHS talk about ‘sleep hygiene’! They make it sound like not sleeping is dirty!! SO – I now turn my phone on silent, I come off screens by about 9pm, I take a bath to try and relax my muscles (I feel so tense all the time so I try and concentrate on relaxing each part of my body in the bath), then I watch something mind-numbing on TV that I don’t have to think about.

My mum says I need to write down all my worries before I try and lay down, so I do that too now! It takes a while though! Lol! I guess it does help a little but sometimes it makes it a bit worse as it makes me think about stuff I’m trying all day to not think about.

My Counsellor at school says music might help so I have been listening to my headphones when I lay down. It doesn’t help me as I just end up singing along though! I’ve given up on that one…

I think the next thing is to take some herbal remedy my mum has got me from the chemist, she says it’s not a medicine as such but it has some herbs that are supposed to be known for calming you down and helping you sleep. I’m going to ask her for that in the morning I think...

I can’t keep going on like this as I feel so tired. I just can’t get up in the morning and the thought of spending the day at school when I’m this tired just makes me more worried. I know I’m really short tempered when I’m tired and then I get worried I’m just going to get snappy with my friends and teachers and end up falling out with everyone.

I guess sleep does effect every area of your life more than you realise… well, more than I ever realised anyway.

I’m going to sit here colouring until my brain finally gives in and lets me sleep now.

Good night!

 x

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Medication and Mental Health

If you have been to the GP you might have been referred to CAMHS (Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services) and it is possible medication may have been discussed.

The most common medications for anxiety, depression and mood regulation in the UK are:

  • Citalopram 
  • Fluoxetine
  • Sertraline

Others may well be prescribed that may suit you as we are all unique in our height, build, symptoms and presentation of our mental health so for more information visit the NHS website. Here they explain how they work and how they help your brain to manage low moods and high emotions.

Our brains are utterly unique. Every single person has a unique chemistry in their bodies so, sometimes, it might take a couple of tries to fit the right medication that suits your chemical make up. 

It is vital that you tell your Doctor straight away if you have any kind of physical reaction to medication but also if you begin to feel lower in your mood or have bad thoughts or dreams. It isn’t uncommon, it just means they can find the best thing to suit you. 

Medication is a personal choice that needs to be fully weighed up by the person themselves, but listen to what the professionals think about how it might benefit you.

Here are some pointers to consider:

  • It’s your choice. As a young adult the decision to take medication is yours; however the people who have recommend it will have trained for many years to help you, so consider their advice.

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  • Research what the options are. Ask for information about each medication they mention, ask them to write it down as often the spelling is a little complicated! 

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  • Talk to others. Ask your parents or trusted friends for their views. These are the people who know you best and know what you have been struggling with; work through it with them.

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  • Ask questions. When you have an appointment write down all your questions about the medication you are being offered, the dosages, how long it takes to begin to work and any side effects.

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  • Don’t be rushed. It’s your choice; take your time to decide. 

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For more information and advise about specific medication you might have been prescribed, check out Young Minds

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OCD, OCD, OCD!

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) isn’t about only writing with a certain pen, having to have your books in alphabetical order or washing your hands loads. 

OCD is life limiting – it is a compulsion which means it’s not a choice; it’s a psychological disorder that compels a person to check their hair straighteners 13 times before leaving for school; or having to turn the light switch on in every room 5 times or only eating green food on days beginning with T (these are all real struggles young people we have worked with have had).

OCD is very tough – it takes over a person’s life because they have to do these ‘checking’ behaviours often to control anxieties. Many people with OCD have experienced some difficulty and find they want to take back control of their lives by repeating activities/behaviours to manage the emotions related to the difficult event.

To help someone with OCD we need to be very, very, very patient.

If you rush them and their routine or activity isn’t completed, they will feel more stressed and may have to increase the repetition to calm themselves down.

Also, it's likely that they will need specific support through counselling or CBT: this helps the person address the underlying emotions of why they have developed the anxieties that led to the compulsive behaviours.

Try not to get frustrated or laugh: the person will be aware they are acting differently but, by your negative response, you might well be making their OCD worse.

Ask how you can help them – they might want to talk about it, they might ask you to count a certain number for them before they engage in the behaviour, they may find it helpful for you to hold their hand to stop their compulsive urges: whatever helps them, ask them.

OCD can grow into new areas – for example a person with issues of cleanliness may restrict their food intake to only eating at home where they know how it was prepared: be ready to observe changes in their behaviours and very gently and kindly point them out when you see them arise so they can develop a self-awareness and seek help.

OCD is a real struggle: let’s all learn some patience to help. 

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Latest Blog

Mr. Sandman

I guess sleep does effect every area of your life more than you realise… well, more than I ever realised anyway...

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